Shows: June 13, 2011

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Villagers resist base construction on Jeju Island

Villagers of Gangjeong on Jeju Island South Korea have been fighting to block the construction of a naval base that will house U.S. Aegis missile destroyers. Two protesters, Professor Yang Yoon-mo and Choi Seung-hee,were jailed last month after crawling under construction trucks to block them from operating. Choi still remains in jail and has begun a hunger strike to garner international support to protect the small fishing village. Gangjeong Village boasts the cleanest water on Jeju Island which has been named a UNESCO world heritage site for its pristine coral reefs and lava tube caves. Critics say the naval base will be deadly to the local ecosystem and destroy the villagers’ way of life. Asia Pacific Forum talks to BRUCE GAGNON, Coordinator of the Global Network Against Weapons and Nuclear Power in Space about the historical context and the latest developments in the struggle to save Gangjeong Village.

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US veterans expose Agent Orange use in Korea

Last month, U.S. veteran Steve House spoke to a local Arizona TV station and broke 30 years of silence about having buried Agent Orange at a U.S. base in South Korea during his service there in 1978. He said, “We basically buried our garbage in their backyard,”and said he was ordered to dig a ditch the size of a city block and bury“fifty-five gallon drums with bright yellow, some of them bright orange, writing on them, which said Province of Vietnam, Compound Orange.” Now, more veterans are coming forward to tell their own stories of Agent Orange exposure in South Korea.

Asia Pacific Forum spoke with four U.S. veterans about their experiences. Scroll down to hear their full interviews.

Click here to hear clips of their interviews and commentary by TED BARKER of the Korean War Project.

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New queer and Asian-inspired Young Adult speculative fiction

In the last decade, book sales in young adult fantasy and science fiction novels have exploded, fueled by the success of popular series like Twilight, the Hunger Games, and Harry Potter. Yet while these books attract a broad readership, the vast majority of their characters are implicitly or explicitly white and heterosexual. Two authors, MALINDA LO and CINDY PON, recently started a project called Diversity in YA to promote young adult books that feature queer and of color characters. APF talks to them about their new books Huntress and Fury of the Phoenix and the politics of young adult speculative fiction.

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Full interview with U.S. veteran Robert Vivona

U.S. veteran Robert Vivona, who served in Korea in 1965-1966, talks about Agent Orange exposure at the Demilitarized Zone in Korea.

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Full interview with U.S. veteran Bob Haynes

U.S. veteran Bob Haynes, who served in Korea from 1966 to 1967, talks about Agent Orange exposure at the Demilitarized Zone in Korea.

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Full interview with U.S. veteran Donald Turner

U.S. veteran Donald Turner, who served in Korea from 1965 to 1966, talks about exposure to Agent Orange at the Demilitarized Zone in Korea.

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Full interview with U.S. veteran David Apperson

U.S. veteran David Apperson of Vets Helping Vets served in Korea from 1977 to 1978 and talks about Agent Orange exposure at the Demilitarized Zone in Korea

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This program is brought to you by Hyun Lee and Irene Tung of the APF collective.

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